Jennifer Ervin

About Jennifer Ervin

Jennifer earned her M.A. in 2012 at the University of Arizona in the Department of Communication.  Her primary area of interest is small group communication processes, with emphases on decision-making, participation, and individual- and group-level processes and their impact on group outcomes over time.  Her other areas of interest are interpersonal and political communication.  Her articles have appeared in Communication Monographs, Communication Research, and Small Group Research, and she has authored many conference papers.  She received two top paper awards from the Group Communication Division of the National Communication Association.  She teaches undergraduate courses in communication theory, research methods, small group communication, public relations, and organizational communication.

Research Interests

Jennifer’s interests include small group communication and decision-making, political communication, and interpersonal communication.

Selected Publications

Bonito, J. A., Gastil, J., Ervin, J. N., & Meyers, R. A. (2014). At the convergence of input and process models of group discussion: A comparison of participation rates across time, person, and groups. Communication Monographs,179-207. doi:10.1080/03637751.2014.883081

Bonito, J. A., Keyton, J., & Ervin, J. N. (In Press). Role-related participation in product design teams: Individual- and group-level. Communication Research.

Bonito, J. A., Meyers, R. A., Gastil, J.,& Ervin, J. (2013). Sit down and speak up: Stability and change in group participation. In L. Carson, J. Gastil, J. Hartz-Karp, & R. Lubensky (Eds.), The Australian Citizens’ Parliament and the future of deliberative democracy. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press.

Ervin, J. N., & Bonito, J. A. (2014). A review and critique of partner effect research in small groups. Small Group Research, 45, 603-632. doi:10.1177/1046496414551027

Jennifer Ervin's picture

Contact Information

Jennifer Ervin
Alumna

Courses Taught

  • Introduction to Communication (Lower Division, Core Class) 
  • Introduction to Small Group Communication (Lower Division, Elective)
  • Introduction to Research Methods and Statistics (Lower Division, Core Class)
  • Introduction to Communication Theory (Lower Division Core Class)
  • Organizational Communication (Upper Division, Elective)
  • Communication and Public Relations (Online, Upper Division, Elective)
  • Theory of Small Group Communication (Online, Upper Division, Elective) The impact of similarity on influence attempts during group discussions
College of Social and Behavioral Sciences